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History of anaesthesia: Overview

This guide has been designed for anaesthetists interested in history of anaesthesia to locate relevant resources on this topic, including those available through the ANZCA library.

Spotlight: Interview with Dr Christine Ball (ABC Mornings)

The chatroom is turned into an operating theatre this morning as Virginia Trioli interviews Dr Christine Ball (ANZCA Fellow) about her upcoming book, The Chloroformist.

Christine Ball is an anaesthetist at the Alfred Hospital in Melbourne, co-manages a Master of Medicine (Perioperative) at Monash University, and is the 2020–2024 Wood Library-Museum Laureate of the History of Anesthesiology. She has been an honorary curator at the Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History for thirty years and is the author of many works in this field.

Spotlight

Spotlight: Anaesthesia and Intensive Care History Supplements

History of Anaesthesia SIG

For more information about this Special Interest Group (SIG), including events, activities and membership, please visit the History of Anaesthesia page on the Anaesthesia Continuing Education website.

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Library feedback form


ANZCA acknowledges the traditional custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises their unique cultural and spiritual relationships to the land, waters and seas and their rich contribution to society. We pay our respects to ancestors and Elders, past, present, and emerging.

ANZCA acknowledges and respects Māori as the Tangata Whenua of Aotearoa and is committed to upholding the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi, fostering the college’s relationship with Māori, supporting Māori fellows and trainees, and striving to improve the health of Māori.